Reviewed by Kirsty Hewitt

The Vet's Daughter, which has been turned into both a play and a musical, has just been reissued by Virago, along with two of Comyns' other novels, Sisters by a River and Our Spoons Came From Woolworths. The novel was first published in 1959, and as well as featuring an introduction written by Comyns herself, this new edition contains an introduction by Jane Gardam, who sets the scene of both the author and her work very nicely indeed. Gardam calls this, Comyns' fourth work, her 'most startling novel... the first in which she shows mastery of the structures of a fast-moving narrative... [It] is not about "enchantment", it is about evil, the evil that can exist in the most humdrum people'.

The opening line alone is intriguing: 'A man with small eyes and a ginger moustache came and spoke to me when I was thinking of something else'. Our narrator, Alice Rowlands, lives in 'a vet's house with a lamp outside... It was my home and it smelt of animals'. Her father's tyrannical cruelty is present from the first page. When describing her mother, Alice says, 'She looked at me with her sad eyes... Her bones were small and her shoulders sloped; her teeth were not straight either; so if she had been a dog, my father would have destroyed her'. In fact, many of the similes throughout are related to animals - for example, 'holding up her little hands like kitten's paws', and 'her lifeless hair... was more like a donkey's tail'. An unsettling sense of foreboding is built up almost immediately, and much of this too has some relation to the animals which fill the house and surgery: 'Before the fireplace was a rug made from a skinned Great Dane dog, and on the curved mantelpiece there was a monkey's skull with a double set of teeth', and 'The door was propped open by a horse's hoof without a horse joined to it'.

Alice is seventeen years old, and her present life in 'the hot, ugly streets of red and yellow houses' in London is interspersed with memories of her mother's upbringing on a secluded farm in Wales. Alice's dreams, which far surpass her sad reality, consist of the following: 'Some day I'll have a baby with frilly pillows and men much grander than my father will open shop doors to me - both doors at once, perhaps'. Alice and her mother are both terrified of her father - her mother tells her daughter that 'He was a great and clever young man, but I was always afraid of him' - and his presence fills the novel even when he is away from home: 'We heard Father leave the house and it became a peaceful evening, except that we had a mongoose in the kitchen'. The fact that her father is even mentioned in the book's title demonstrates the level of control he has over her. To add to their troubles, Alice's mother becomes ill. Desperate Alice laments somewhat over her fading life, telling us that, 'I felt a great sorrow for her and knew that she would soon die', and 'Autumn came and Mother was still dying in her room'. Her father, as is to be expected, exhibits his usual cruelty when faced with the news; he sends a man in to measure his wife for her coffin whilst she is still alive.

Throughout, Alice is an incredibly honest narrator. One gets the sense that we as readers see her world exactly as she does, and that nothing has been altered before it reaches the page. All of the characters throughout feel so real, and Comyns has built them up steadily and believably. Their actions do not feel forced, which demonstrates Comyns' deftness of touch. Whilst The Vet's Daughter is a sad novel - well, a novella, really - what sadness there is is interspersed with humour and wit. The balance between the two has been met beautifully. For example, just after Alice's mother's death, Comyns describes the way in which 'Already the parrot had been banished to the downstairs lavatory, and in its boredom had eaten huge holes in the floor'.

Tumultuous relationships between characters are portrayed with such clarity of the human condition throughout the book, and the story is both powerful and memorable in its tale and its telling. Alice faces more challenges than the average teenager, but her strength of mind and the way in which she always tries to make the best out of a bad situation endear her to the reader. Her honesty shines through, particularly as her story progresses: 'I wrote a letter to Blinkers. Although it wasn't very long, it took me two weeks to write because it was the first one I'd ever written - there had been no one to write to before'. The Vet's Daughter is a beautifully and sympathetically written book, which takes many unexpected twists and turns, and presents the reader with a story which is likely to stay with them for an awfully long time.

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Kirsty Hewitt

Kirsty Hewitt is an English and History graduate who specialises in freelance proofreading and writing book reviews. She has been published in 'The Times Literary Supplement' and 'The Self-Publishing Magazine', and is currently working as a proofreader for Oxford University Press.  Kirsty's favourite reading categories are contemporary fiction, classic fiction, travel books, poetry, historical non-fiction, short stories, and volumes of letters and diaries. Among her favourite authors are Harper Lee, Tove Jansson, Katherine Mansfield, Kate Atkinson, Sylvia Plath, Stephen Fry and Wilfred Owen.

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