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Clone Rebellion: Alliance, by Steven L Kent

review published on July 2, 2013. Reviewed by jj redfearn

Nudge Reviewer Rating:

This series continues, almost imperceptibly, to improve. Improvement that isn’t too hard to achieve.

Alliance is a bit repetitive with all the main scenes happening twice, but otherwise for lightning-fast action and fairly mindless blasting away there’s a lot going for it. Its moved to a stage beyond comic-strip action though not quite arrived at fully-fledged book.

Wayson Harris (spoiler coming up) escapes from the boondock religious farming world he’d been trapped on, reads the bible, joins up with the friendly Japanese fleet, is returned to Earth to persuade the authorities that Japanese are friends-not-food only to be promptly demoted even faster than he was previously elevated. Sergeant again he visits a wrecked Mogat battleship (twice), sends a Boyd Clone off to see what he can find and then follows on himself to find the clone. Next he discovers the Mogat home world (alternatively known as HomeMo or Mogatopolis), escapes and returns home, is advised that HomeMo is entirely constructed from “Distilled shit gas”, returns there again with an invasion fleet and participates, albeit unknowingly, in a spot of genocide before escaping back home again. There is a lot of “distilled shit gas”. Kent’s use of bad language can be somewhat off-putting, is definitely not necessary and he’s even introduced characters who don’t like it.

Best part of the book is the fight scenes, both on the wrecked ships and on, or rather under, the ground on Mogatopolis. Low average serves for the description of Mogatopolis. A bit dire would cover off the extraordinary Harris’ continual meetings and discussions with the most senior of the various military staff and really really dire is much too good a term for the casual genocide and the “distilled shit gas”.

Book three is better than book one, on a par with and possibly an improvement in parts on book 2. Why do I still read these? I’m hoping for the best for books four and five.

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They Tyrant’s Law, by Daniel Abraham

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